Whether the price is worth it is in the eyes of the beholder. Vue may not be the cheapest, but many users feel it is the best value according to anecdotal reports in various forums. That assessment is based on features, channel selection, user interface, DVR, etc. Regardless of which streaming service is chosen, the vast majority of cord cutters claim they are saving a bundle compared to traditional cable/satellite. As for Vue's competitors, by the time you include add-ons (e.g., sports and/or movie packages) and premium channels, are you really saving much? Some of the competition also charges extra for DVR usage, but not with Vue.


Beware of the trial period for Sling, they charge you on the very minute your trial expires and will not refund your money. I just called because there was a 12 hour delay from the time my trial expired and I was charged and when I cancelled (my fault, I know). Thought I'd call and explain the mixup thinking the trial was for the full day and I cancelled at 8am the next day, they will not refund my money. I mentioned that seemed like big cable company treatment and the rep didn't seem to care, company policy is not to refund any partial months. Seems to me like a great way to sucker a bunch of potential new customers into paying for a month, not a fan of that type of business practice.
While some services like Hulu live TV provide NBC, FOX, ABC, and CBS to many, you may still want to look into getting a TV Antenna. It allows you to watch free broadcast TV, with access to networks like NBC, CBS, ABC, Fox and more. The over the air broadcast TV available changes depending on where you live in relation to your closest TV towers. Thankfully, antenna maker Mohu has put together a tool that shows you which TV channels are available in your area. They also show which channels you should expect to receive for each of their antennas.
Those increases aren’t always obvious to customers, either. In November, Charter raised Spectrum’s “Broadcast TV” surcharge from $9 to $10 per month, increased cable box fees from $7 to $7.50 per month, hiked digital adapter fees from $5 to $6 per month, and reduced the discount for bundling TV with internet by $5 per month. Charter plans to tack another $2 per month onto its “Broadcast TV” fee in March, bringing the surcharge price to $12 per month. Spectrum’s advertised pricing doesn’t reflect most of those rate increases.
For when I have the urge, I have the Network stations, youtube, and Netflix. When I get done with these, I’m often struck with a visual hangover. I’m finding that when it comes to actually getting something of substance, it’s really hard to beat the good old fashioned library book (unless you have a specific question, and then Youtube can work its magic). I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read a book from the 80s or 90s, and then the same concepts explained in the books I’ve chosen to read are explained without being updated very much on the news or in the current memes (ie: The income inequality gap has been unacceptably large for decades, and that was mainstreamed just a few months ago. Also, a lot of the fiscal meltdowns we faced recently were predicted for our times in the ’90s.) Not to mention: In my city, all the art museums are free, and typically smaller museums are only $5 to $7 for a few hours of entertainment.
Los Angeles Spectrum gave us an online quote of $89.93 for entry-level TV service that includes 2 DVRs, but cautions that prices will go up by $4 in February, bringing the total to $93.93, before taxes. (We tried getting TV-only pricing from L.A. competitor Frontier, but the rep told us the company won't sell TV service without getting Internet as well.)
About this Service: WhistleOut maintains a broad list of providers to help you compare, always covering at least the top ten providers in every category so you can make a transparent choice. When you see a 'promoted product' or a product with a 'go to site' button it means that WhistleOut is earning a transaction click fee for the referral. We audit the prices across the whole market regularly and we don't alter the ranking of products in our organic search based on any commercial relationship. Find out more here
I ended up cutting the cord about a little over a year ago. I watch a couple comedies (modern family, the office) before going to bed via a free app on my phone. The programming for the kids on Netflix is perfect. They usually watch that on a rainy day. I am however contemplating cutting Netflix as well since we could almost as easily use our library card to rent a couple DVDs every so often and not have “TV” so easily accessible.
You don’t have to give up TV entirely to put some savings away. If you like traditional cable, satellite, or fiber TV, consider bundling or going with a smaller channel lineup. If you need only basic local channels, try out OTA TV. And if you’re looking for more flexibility than cable television can offer, see if you can affordably go the streaming live TV route.
During the 1990s, the pressure to accommodate the growing array of offerings resulted in digital transmission that made more efficient use of the VHF signal capacity; fibre optics was common to carry signals into areas near the home, where coax could carry higher frequencies over the short remaining distance. Although for a time in the 1980s and 1990s, television receivers and VCRs were equipped to receive the mid-band and super-band channels. Due to the fact that the descrambling circuitry was for a time present in these tuners, depriving the cable operator of much of their revenue, such cable-ready tuners are rarely used now – requiring a return to the set-top boxes used from the 1970s onward.
With a cable, fiber, or satellite TV package, Drew will have access to all of his favorite networks in one place. No need to sign up for 4 different streaming services to get the shows that he wants. He's covered with a single TV package. Thanks to amazing DVR equipment like the DIRECTV Genie, Drew can record all of his favorite shows and movies, even if the shows air at the same time. And, he can fast forward through all of those boring commercials. This also means that he'll never have to miss a season premiere or new episode of the Bachelor while he's on the road. Drew can even watch his recordings or live TV on his tablet from the comfort of the hotel room. Many TV providers also offer On Demand options that give you access to thousands of free titles to watch, so movie night will be a breeze. The only problem he'll have will be choosing something to watch from all those titles!

In second quarter 2011, Comcast lost 238,000 television customers, compared to 265,000 a year earlier, though the company was making up for these losses with increases in other services such as Internet. Moffett said the slowing rate indicated that online sources were not making people drop cable as quickly. On the other hand, Time Warner Cable and Charter Communications lost more customers in the quarter than in 2010.[9] Time Warner Cable lost 130,000, while Dish Network lost 135,000; by comparison, DirecTV gained 26,000 subscribers, compared to 100,000 the previous year. Nielsen Media Research estimated that the number of households with at least one television set had decreased from 115.9 million to 114.7 million, while also estimating an increase in program viewing by computer, tablets or smartphones. Services such as U-verse were increasing their subscriber numbers by offering special features: U-verse's "My Multiview" option allowed people to watch four channels at once, while Cablevision's "iO TV Quick Views" allowed the display of up to nine channels at once.[10]

By comparison, traditional TV providers face a huge risk in diverging from the status quo. Just look at what’s happening with DirecTV and Dish Network: Both companies dove headfirst into streaming with DirecTV Now and Sling TV respectively, yet those services aren’t drawing enough subscribers to compensate for the hundreds of thousands of customers now fleeing satellite TV every quarter.
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Step 3: Cancel your pay TV subscription.  Even if you are unsure that you have all your shows covered without cable, cancel anyway. Like me, you will realize a lot of the stuff we watch is simply because it’s on. You’ll also discover there is a lot higher quality TV shows are not on traditional TV. Cancel now and start saving today. If you don’t like being a cord cutter, your pay TV company will gladly take you back.
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