Most cable companies require a set-top box to view their cable channels, even on newer televisions with digital cable QAM tuners, because most digital cable channels are now encrypted, or "scrambled", to reduce cable service theft. A cable from the jack in the wall is attached to the input of the box, and an output cable from the box is attached to the television, usually the RF-IN or composite input on older TVs. Since the set-top box only decodes the single channel that is being watched, each television in the house requires a separate box. Some unencrypted channels, usually traditional over-the-air broadcast networks, can be displayed without a receiver box.[1] The cable company will provide set top boxes based on the level of service a customer purchases, from basic set top boxes with a standard definition picture connected through the standard coaxial connection on the TV, to high-definition wireless DVR receivers connected via HDMI or component. Older analog television sets are "cable ready" and can receive the old analog cable without a set-top box. To receive digital cable channels on an analog television set, even unencrypted ones, requires a different type of box, a digital television adapter supplied by the cable company. A new distribution method that takes advantage of the low cost high quality DVB distribution to residential areas, uses TV gateways to convert the DVB-C, DVB-C2 stream to IP for distribution of TV over IP network in the home.
Cable, from providers such as XFINITY, Spectrum and Cox, is likely available in your area. DSL is another commonly available internet service, from providers including AT&T, Verizon and Frontier. Fiber technology is available primarily in select metro areas and include providers such as CenturyLink and AT&T. Rural areas will likely have the fewest internet options and may only be eligible for satellite internet providers such as HughesNet. Use Allconnect to find out which internet options are available in your area.
If you have a TV in your house -- that is, a screen that incorporates a tuner -- you're part-way to cutting the cord already. An affordable indoor antenna hooked up to your TV will let you watch free TV over the air from any channel you receive in your local broadcast area. Antennas cost as little as $10. See our comparison of indoor antennas here.
Vue may be more expensive in your area if you have more local channels. In our area the cheapest bundle is $29.99, and I’m on the expanded $34.99 package with regional sports networks. In some markets the cost may be higher if you have local channels included in the package – in my market only 2 local channels are included, and as such the cost is less.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) defines a broadband connection as one with download speeds of 25 Mbps or higher and upload speeds of 3 Mbps or higher. These speeds are perfect for basic internet use, streaming shows and gaming online. Faster speeds like 100 Mbps or higher are ideal for connecting 5 or more devices and heavy streaming in HD or 4K video quality. Find the internet speeds you need with Allconnect.
DIRECTV offers a discount for AT&T wireless customers who have the AT&T Unlimited Plus Enhanced plan. If you don't already have AT&T wireless, you could switch to save. It’s also possible to bundle DIRECTV with home phone or internet to get a discount on individual services. Another benefit of bundling: having multiple utilities on one bill. Remembering payments and avoiding late fees just got a whole lot easier.

Since cutting cable TV, my family doesn’t miss our cable TV package one bit. We use our cell phones to replace the home phone, which we thought we would miss but don’t. We especially don’t miss the telemarketers. The kids initially missed a few channels, but now they are content fighting with each other over which of the thousands of kids’ shows at their disposal they will watch during their TV time.
Cable ISPs leverage some of the bandwidth they use to bring people television service to deliver data - thankfully without any noticeable negative impact to the former, in most cases. Cable is an always-on connection, which means that your modem is always in communication with your ISP, and it tends to be faster than DSL because your distance from the service provider isn't an issue. The only drawback of cable internet is that service delivery is sometimes less reliable during peak usage hours, as cable customers local to one another share their bandwidth.
With the least cable-like interface of the Big 5, Hulu's greatest asset is the integration of live TV with its significant catalog of on-demand content for one price. Unfortunately, the interface frustrations apparent with the standard service are amplified once you add live TV. The app generally confuses "simple" with "incomplete." It technically offers a guide, for example, but it's extremely bare-bones. Another issue is that you'll have to pay extra, a hefty $15 per month, to get the ability to skip commercials on Hulu's cloud DVR. Its channel count is solid, but YouTube TV at $5 less is a better value if you don't care about Hulu's catalog.
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