Other TV providers are now putting similar compensational price hikes in place. This year, Comcast is raising its regional sports fee by an average $1.50 per month, and its broadcast TV fee by $2 per month, Bloomberg reports, while DirecTV and Dish are both raising prices by $3 per month or more for all packages. DirecTV is also pulling back on the discounts it once offered to new subscribers as roughly two million customers reach the end of their two-year contracts, The Wall Street Journal reports, because there’s little point in offering unprofitable promo deals if those customers end up leaving.
DIRECTV offers a discount for AT&T wireless customers who have the AT&T Unlimited Plus Enhanced plan. If you don't already have AT&T wireless, you could switch to save. It’s also possible to bundle DIRECTV with home phone or internet to get a discount on individual services. Another benefit of bundling: having multiple utilities on one bill. Remembering payments and avoiding late fees just got a whole lot easier.
In fact, industry analysts say people are leaving traditional pay-TV services at an accelerating rate and turning to cable-like streaming subscription services instead. These aren't services like Netflix that carry individual movies and TV series. Instead, they provide channels of content such as AMC, CNN, and HGTV along with broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC).
I take it you have done your homework and it sounds as though you know your stuff! However, I do not know who you are or if you are a “plant” by the cable industry to down talk these alternative methods to cable. Having said that, I need to do my own research and I know I have to start somewhere, so I consider your remarks and opinions as that start. The problem I see in doing research is “who to trust”! Call me cynical if you wish. However, I detest these things about cable: 1) The major cable companies (Comcast, Spectrum, et al) control the perimeters of choice for consumers by, as you stated, “blocking” given areas; 2) If you want to watch a given number of channels, the cable companies mentioned control the “plans” for the channels that include my favorites like sports, local channels, documentaries, etc… I could not care less for the so-called movie channels that show hardly anything but smut movies. I have to pay an astronomical monthly fee to get the preferred channels and pay for channels I do not want or watch. I suppose I could list much more disgust that I have for cable. However, all I would be doing is frustrating myself more. The task of searching for the best solution is to me, much too tedious and not as trustworthy as is being touted by these “cable cutting” enterprises. So, until I can find a more realistic alternative, I will stay with the blood-sucking cable company which I currently have.
5G, in short, is the next generation of wireless Internet: one built to support home Internet. With this newer, faster wireless technology, we’ll have more options when it comes to how we connect our devices. Rather than being stuck with two or three Internet providers in your area, you’ll soon be able to add mobile companies and even new companies such as DISH and Google. Even Spectrum is working on 5G with the hopes of launching 5G home Internet in areas they do not currently offer Internet service in.
After years of programming rate increases, the cost of the bundle has become so high that pay-TV packages are low-margin or sometimes even negative-margin offerings. The business is even worse for new digital video providers such as Google's YouTube TV, which are starting from a base of zero and must keep prices low to attract new subscribers. As Bernstein analyst Todd Juenger explained, YouTube TV loses money on its digital bundle. Google's hope is to eventually raise prices after taking subscribers and making enough money on advertising to make up for the losses.
The Internet is your friend. As long as you have an internet connection, you can still watch some television. Many of the TV networks post videos of their shows on their websites which are available to watch for free. There are a number of other websites which provide hundreds of television series links, and allow you to browse the shows and watch all from their website. Some of the sites provide the service for free, while others charge a few bucks a month to users but either way, you’re going to save a lot of money compared to your existing cable bill.
I hope you’ll forgive me, or at least not ostracize me. Ultimately, my cord cutting attempt, much like any attempt I’ve made to withhold my rage at the interim head coach for terrible clock management, or the defense’s unfathomable inability to recover a forced fumble, has failed. But I did cut the Dish bill by over 60%, which will save me over $600 in the next ten months. It’s not a $1,000 savings, but it’s a start.

The best way to check this is to search by your zip code. If you’re in a more rural area, satellite internet and TV might be an option you want to pursue. Although satellite isn’t ideal for internet speed, it can do the job in a pinch. If you’re in a metropolitan area, you might have access to fiber internet and TV, which is far faster than DSL and most cable networks.
If you haven’t heard of Tablo, it is a clever little box. You plug it into your wall socket, connect your over-the-air TV antenna to the Tablo, and then download the sister app to your phone or tablet. The Tablo can connect to your house router via WiFi or by using the included Ethernet cable. I used the cable. Then the app brings up an easy-to-use TV guide on your phone. You can record shows and series as you would with any other DVR, and you can watch live TV through it. Its playback functions and interface are awesome -- much easier to traverse than the one I pay for with ATT -- and let me zip through commercials in seconds. In another part of my home, I have a smart TV with Roku built in. It has a Tablo app on it that allows me to watch my recordings or live TV on the big screen. And I also have a Chromecast on my other TV to do the same.
DIRECTV’s promotional pricing is low, but you will see a spike in your monthly rate after your first year of service. The good news is, the company doesn’t hide the price increase, allowing you to budget for it in advance. But because DIRECTV requires a 24-month contract, you are more or less guaranteed to experience it, and with a prorated early termination fee, you’ll have to pay for the months remaining in your contract if you decide to cancel your service. Are you a renter, a student, or just someone who doesn’t like being in long-term contracts? DIRECTV might not be your best cheap TV provider.

Now there are some things about Tablo TV I need to get used to. When I bring up the app on the Roku box, I oddly have to remind it every time which Tablo TV box I’m tapping -- even though I only have one. And when I go to watch live TV, it takes a good 20-to-25 seconds to load each channel. This makes channel surfing rather impossible, especially when I have to return to the Live TV menu first before selecting another channel. And I’ve also had several scheduled recordings not record because the reception was too weak, according to the error message. As I mentioned, that’s a problem with our home and not Tablo.

Slingbox – Originally the only way to enjoy SlingTV, Slingbox offers an integrated television and streaming solution in one package. Serious techies may enjoy the vast abilities of this box, but those with less technology comfort may are likely going to be happier with a simpler option like Roku or Chromecast. Slingbox allows you to stream your local cable TV to your phone or browser while away from home or stream SlingTV and other services. The most popular Slingbox is the M2 for $99. The more powerful Slingbox 500 runs $299.
If you have a TV in your house -- that is, a screen that incorporates a tuner -- you're part-way to cutting the cord already. An affordable indoor antenna hooked up to your TV will let you watch free TV over the air from any channel you receive in your local broadcast area. Antennas cost as little as $10. See our comparison of indoor antennas here.
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