Some seven years ago, we ditched the typical landline phone line. Cut that cord right in two. Being a physician on call about 10 to 12 nights a month, I didn’t want to be without a backup to the cell phone, and we don’t love giving out our cell phone numbers for everything, so we kept our home number. We picked up an Ooma box, ported the number, and have kept that number to this day, despite moving to a new state twice in the interim.
Yeah, we had loading problems with Sling and it would often, maybe even a majority of the time, default to low res which was literally painful to watch. My eyes kept straining like it was their fault that everything was blurry. We called Comcast and they gave us a better price so DH and I just met in the middle with cheaper cable. The marginal cost is actually quite low as we bundle with internet. Though I guess they aren’t bundle pricing any more so he and I may need to renegotiate when our price is up.
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Just like it does with TV service, CableTV.com shows you cable internet providers in your area along with any competing fiber, DSL, or satellite internet providers. You can even see which providers in your area offer to bundle both TV and internet service. This helps you identify potential savings because almost all companies that provide both services offer discounts for bundling.
If you know you’re not moving anytime soon, bundling Fios services is a cost-effective plan. Bundling Fios TV with home phone, internet, or both — and opting for the two-year bundling contract — guarantees you’ll pay the promotional price for the duration of your contract. You’ll save money with Double Play and Triple Play bundles, and it makes budgeting for your utilities less of a hassle.

After Charter Communications recently acquired Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks, it rebranded as Spectrum and has worked to simplify its services. Unfortunately, that means you’ll only have one option if you just want cable TV. That one TV-only plan is called TV Select. It comes with at least 125 channels and about 46% of the most popular channels. Notable absences include E! and the Travel Channel, but otherwise you’ll be getting a fair number of major networks.
Many of our Xfinity TV packages feature Xfinity X1, a simple and easy entertainment experience that integrates all your favorites — from Netflix* and YouTube** to live TV — all in one place. Change the way you experience TV with X1 and find the perfect Xfinity TV deal for you. You can even get personalized recommendations based on what you’re watching. With advanced search capabilities, you can search across Xfinity X1 by title, genre, or actor and get instant results across live TV, Xfinity on Demand and your DVR. Advanced DVR can be added to most Xfinity TV deals, so you can store hundreds of shows, take your DVR library to go, and record up to five shows while watching another. Enhance your experience even further with the X1 Voice Remote, often a favorite feature of an Xfinity TV deal. Simply say it and see it — it’s as easy as talking!
Sony PS4 (starting at $299.99) / Microsoft XBox ($299 to $499): One of the biggest unexpected players in this space has been the major video game console companies. The Sony PS4 and Xbox One X are state-of-the-art in terms of their streaming capabilities, and they’re even creating their own services that attempt to serve the same functions as traditional cable TV. (More on that later.) The Xbox One S, Microsoft’s previous model, was still for sale as of August 2018, at $200 less than the One X. Click here to compare the two on the Xbox website.
First, the best TV moved from networks to cable. Now a similar transition is moving top talent from cable to the streaming world. Netflix ($8.99 per month for HD streaming) has House of Cards, Orange Is the New Black, and Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt—all of which have received almost universal acclaim—and Amazon ($99 per year for video and a variety of other services) isn’t too far behind with comedy Alpha House, crime drama Bosch, and the Golden Globe-winning Transparent.

Disclaimer: The information featured in this article is based on our best estimates of pricing, package details, contract stipulations, and service available at the time of writing. This is not a guarantee. All information is subject to change. Pricing will vary based on various factors, including, but not limited to, the customer’s location, package chosen, added features and equipment, the purchaser’s credit score, etc. For the most accurate information, please ask your customer service representative. Clarify all fees and contract details before signing a contract or finalizing your purchase. Each individual's unique needs should be considered when deciding on chosen products.


You might think that local news and cable news would be easy to find via your set-top box, but even if you get a live TV subscription, it may be missing your local channels, and it may not have your preferred cable pundits. (Fox News, for example, isn’t available on every service.) Hulu With Live TV will get you a lot of what you need with minimal hassle, but do check out your local line-up on the Hulu website first.
Because the content you get with any of these cable-replacement services, especially local channels, can vary by region, you should go to each company’s website, plug in your ZIP code, and see which channels are available in your area. These video streaming services have been adding more local broadcast channels, such as ABC and CBS, but they’re not always available in smaller communities.
What we don't like about Hulu are the ads on their on-demand library. However, they do offer an ad-free version for $4/month extra. Also, there are a few big channels that Hulu doesn't have. AMC is the biggest one, as well as channels from Viacom (which means no Comedy Central, MTV, Spike, Nickelodeon, and so on). Starz and Discovery channels aren't included either.
In second quarter 2011, Comcast lost 238,000 television customers, compared to 265,000 a year earlier, though the company was making up for these losses with increases in other services such as Internet. Moffett said the slowing rate indicated that online sources were not making people drop cable as quickly. On the other hand, Time Warner Cable and Charter Communications lost more customers in the quarter than in 2010.[9] Time Warner Cable lost 130,000, while Dish Network lost 135,000; by comparison, DirecTV gained 26,000 subscribers, compared to 100,000 the previous year. Nielsen Media Research estimated that the number of households with at least one television set had decreased from 115.9 million to 114.7 million, while also estimating an increase in program viewing by computer, tablets or smartphones. Services such as U-verse were increasing their subscriber numbers by offering special features: U-verse's "My Multiview" option allowed people to watch four channels at once, while Cablevision's "iO TV Quick Views" allowed the display of up to nine channels at once.[10]
What you get: The sports-centric Fubo now offers about 75 channels for the base $45-per-month package, or more than 90 channels with the new $50-per-month Fubo Extra plan. With Fubo you get a mix of live and on-demand channels from broadcast networks (CBS, Fox, and NBC in most markets), cable channels (A&E, Bravo, FX, SyFy, USA), and sports networks (BeIn Sports, FS1, Golf Channel, NBA TV). The company recently reached a deal to add Viacom channels (including BET, CMT, Comedy Central, MTV, Nickelodeon, Paramount Network, TV Land, and VH1) to the base plan, and some additional ones as part of Fubo Extra. You now get Turner channels, too, plus sports programming such as the MLB on TBS and the NBA on TNT. Also in the mix: a robust roster of regional sports networks—including those from NBC, Fox, and Yes—for local-team action, including MLB and NHL games. The service comes with a free cloud DVR that lets you store 30 hours of shows, movies, and games.
If you don’t have or don’t like any of the options above, there are a few ways to turn your TV into a “Smart TV.” There are a number of ways to do this. In the next section, I’ll cover the subscription services available. Certain devices only work on certain equipment so I’ll cover a few of these combinations in the Streaming Devices section of the post.
Most of the time, it’s not difficult to find deals on TV packages. Common deals providers offer include discounts on services, Visa® Prepaid Cards, and free premium channels. Though most deals are advertised on providers’ websites, it’s a good idea to call and ask a sales representative if there are any additional deals not offered online. On the other hand, some deals are online exclusives and might not be honored if you order service over the phone.
Comcast reported a loss of 275,000 subscribers in the third quarter of 2010, bringing the total for the calendar year to 625,000. The company said most of these losses were not from people leaving for another service. Moffett pointed out that cable companies needed to offer lower-cost packages,[7] but a survey by Strategy Analytics revealed financial considerations were not the primary reason. People were not satisfied with what they could get, and online sources had a wider array of content. The survey showed that 13% of cable subscribers intended to cancel service in the next year. Slightly more than half were under the age of 40, and nearly all had a high school education. Two-thirds had or planned further schooling, and just over half earned at least $50,000 a year.[8]
Cable companies tend to make bundling TV, phone, and internet easy, which means lots of savings for you. Not only are bundles cheaper than buying the services individually, they’re also convenient because you don’t have to deal with more than one supplier—that cuts out hassle and paperwork. Use our site to compare prices and check for providers offering phone, internet, and cable bundles.
Usually, providers’ TV packages are set in stone. Oftentimes that means you end up paying for channels you don’t even watch. Verizon Fios’s entry-level Custom TV plan offers 155+ channels and lets you choose your programming from seven unique packages. The options include everything from Action & Adventure to Home & Family, so you can get the types of channels you and your family want, without the fillers.
What you get: With recently updated pricing, Sling’s Orange package is now $25 and includes about 30 cable channels but no broadcast TV. It supports one user at a time. Sling Blue, also $25 per month, supports three users and a different mix of about 40 channels, including local broadcasts and regional sports. (Among other differences: Sling Orange includes ESPN.) A combined plan costs $40. Themed add-on packs cost $5 per month, and you can add HBO, $15; Showtime, $10; and Starz, $9. Sling is currently running a promotion that gives you either the Blue or Orange plans for $15 a month, or the combined plan for $25 a month, for the first three months.

For when I have the urge, I have the Network stations, youtube, and Netflix. When I get done with these, I’m often struck with a visual hangover. I’m finding that when it comes to actually getting something of substance, it’s really hard to beat the good old fashioned library book (unless you have a specific question, and then Youtube can work its magic). I can’t tell you how many times I’ve read a book from the 80s or 90s, and then the same concepts explained in the books I’ve chosen to read are explained without being updated very much on the news or in the current memes (ie: The income inequality gap has been unacceptably large for decades, and that was mainstreamed just a few months ago. Also, a lot of the fiscal meltdowns we faced recently were predicted for our times in the ’90s.) Not to mention: In my city, all the art museums are free, and typically smaller museums are only $5 to $7 for a few hours of entertainment.
Although HBO and Showtime are perhaps better-known these days for original programming, they still show recent theatrical releases, and they make them available through their subscription services. Starz is also excellent for anyone seeking current blockbusters. Consider tacking on a subscription to one, two or all three of these to an Amazon Prime Video account. Video-on-demand rentals are also an option, facilitated by multiple retailers. And if you’re interested in owning digital copies of your movies, the service Movies Anywhere is a helpful way to manage and view your library.
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