Cox has two DVR units, which comes with a monthly rental fee. The 'Contour Record 2 HD-DVR' unit costs $21.49/month, and can record up to two simultaneous recordings with 200 hours of DVR storage. The more advanced unit, the 'Contour Record 6 HD-DVR', costs $28.49/month, and can record up to six simultaneous recordings with 1000 hours of DVR storage.
Looking for cable TV providers in your area? InMyArea.com has you covered. We've partnered with the largest TV providers in the nation to find the best plans available to you. Whether you're moving to a new city, doing research, or you just want to switch to a new provider, you're in the right place. Simply type in your zip code and we'll show you a list of the best TV plans in your area, so you can compare and shop at the click of a button.
So how does satellite TV work? Satellite TV transmits signals from a satellite up in space to a dish on the roof of your home. This communication between the two satellites is what gives you the ability to watch television. Satellite TV is a great option for those that live in rural areas, because it's much more widely available than other types of TV. Cable and fiber TV require wires and cables, and this infrastructure is often not present in remote areas. Virtually anyone can get satellite TV, unless the signal is hindered by a foreign object, or the resident can't install a dish. Satellite also offers better picture quality and has the most HD channels available out of all types of TV. Not only is the quality great, but satellite TV packages are typically cheaper than fiber or cable TV. One drawback to satellite is that it usually requires a long term contract. Make sure you're ready to commit, because most providers will charge an early termination fee if you decide to cancel before your contract is up. Also, the quality of your satellite TV programming can be hindered by extreme weather conditions.
It’s really not that big of a shock that a major TV provider has inconsistent customer service at best. We pitted DIRECTV and DISH against each other in the customer service department, and DISH falls short on the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI1).  From our experience, you can expect longer hold times with DISH’s customer service department.
As more and more people cut the cord, the hunt for the best alternatives to cable TV heats up. If you’ve already weighed the pros and cons between streaming services and cable TV, and are leaning towards a cordless lifestyle, you’re certainly not alone. With no hidden fees, easy cancellation, and even DVR Cloud storage, it’s easy to see why people are making the switch to streaming alternatives. Yet, with so many exciting and affordable options, it can be hard to break through the clutter and find what’s best for you.
The first thing to do is think about your TV watching habits. Do you have any specific “must see” shows? Write down the name of the show, and the network it is on. Do you watch a lot of sports. If so, see if there is a season pass you can buy for the Internet (you can stream these on many newer TV sets). Write down your TV watching habits – are you a channel surfer, do you TIVO or record everything, etc. Your responses will give you a good idea of whether or not you can drop your cable TV subscription.
You will instantly get over 100 channels, and there are tons more that you can add along the way. PlayLater is software for your computer or mobile device that records streaming media, saving it to your device for future viewing.  If you already have a streaming device or gaming console, you've already got most of the features offered by this software, but for $39.99 for lifetime access, you won't waste a lot of money trying it out.
Even your wireless router can affect video performance. Older routers may be slower or use only one frequency band, which can lead to interference from baby monitors, cordless phones, and even microwaves. Newer dual-band routers have two bands—2.4 GHz and 5 GHz—to provide you with a second option. If there are dead zones in your home where WiFi doesn’t reach, routers that create a mesh network could help.

Neither of us have ever watched sports, so that make it easier. I didn’t have cable growing up. The first year or two we were married, we would get the 3 month trials. We haven’t had it at all for the last 12 years. Beings we never had it for more than a few months, I can’t really say I miss it. Our company keeps calling us because it would only be $10 a month more to add channels. But there is no way I would want to fight that battle with my kids. After our 6 week trip (with no netflix), I have managed to keep screen time for the oldest two under 25 minutes a day. And my youngest have forgotten about it all together! At this point, I don’t know if they could pay me to get channels.
My husband and I have looked into ending our cable service and moving to one of the many options presented here. However our challenge is that we haven’t found a great alternative to access a wide variety of sports events that are currently shown on cable channels like ESPN2, ESPNU, etc. ESPN3 online does have some events, but not the variety we would be looking for. Has anyone else addressed this challenge and found a suitable alternative?
To really live the cutting the cord life to its fullest, you ditch cable TV, hold onto the internet, and either use an antenna (if you care about local channels), or buy a cheap streaming device, like a Roku player or Amazon Fire TV Stick ($25 to $50.) Most current TVs sold today are "smart" in that they have built in apps like Netflix, Hulu or Amazon Prime to watch, and you don't need an accessory to bring them in. If you have a "dumb" TV, you'll need the streaming players, which are heavily discounted during holiday sales.
I canceled cable in March and haven’t missed it one bit. I’ve been just watching over the air channels, Netflix, and some Hulu. I’m working on a solution to get baseball as I like watching the Orioles. I’ve heard of an IP switching program called “hide my a$$” which should work in conjunction with MLB tv to be able to get Orioles games. (They are blacked out in the local area)
My husband and I have looked into ending our cable service and moving to one of the many options presented here. However our challenge is that we haven’t found a great alternative to access a wide variety of sports events that are currently shown on cable channels like ESPN2, ESPNU, etc. ESPN3 online does have some events, but not the variety we would be looking for. Has anyone else addressed this challenge and found a suitable alternative?
Navigate Computer With Mouse & Keyboard:  You connect your computer to the HDTV (for the big screen) and then proceed to go to your favorite websites like hulu.com, Netflix and others (see some options above) to view your shows.  You can use the Hulu Desktop application.  You can also watch shows that you've downloaded from Amazon, Itunes or other online video sources – or your own videos.  You will most likely need a wireless keyboard and mouse to make this easy – although it isn't required.
Xfinity TV packages include access to the Xfinity Stream app, which offers a great way to keep up with live TV on any device, anywhere — all without the need for a TV box. With Xfinity Stream, TV customers can stream 10+ channels on any screen and have the option to add more channels anytime. Access TV shows and movies from anywhere, watch live sports on the go, and stream live TV from over 90 networks — all possible with our best streaming experience (the Xfinity Stream app) included with the latest Xfinity TV deals.
In order to receive the promotional rate, you will be required to authorize and agree that Cable ONE may obtain a consumer report about you in accordance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act from a consumer reporting agency in order to verify your eligibility to receive this and other offers as well as determining deposits and install fees required, if any. Full discounted installation could require enrolling in our Cable ONE Easy Pay program.
Antenna: The antenna is the way TV started. You connect an indoor or outdoor antenna to your TV and receive programs from over-the-air local and network affiliate TV channels. This is a great way to receive free programming from the major TV networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, WB, and PBS). It is important to note that older analog TVs, and many HDTVs made before 2007, will require the use of a digital converter box that is placed between the antenna and the TV. 
Most cord cutters seem to focus on TV as cord cutting and not home Internet. Yet there is a growing trend toward not only cutting the cable TV bill but also the cable Internet bill. Almost every day someone asks how to lower their Internet bill or if they can use their cellphone for home Internet. The good news is there is a growing push to help you cut the cord on home Internet.
There are other TV providers, such as RCN, Mediacom, and Suddenlink, but we didn’t include them in the “Best Cable TV Providers” because either 1) they are not widely available or 2) they did not meet our criteria. We determined which cable TV providers are the best (or better than most) by comparing prices, contracts, fees, channels, DVRs, and availability.
In my Google Chromecast Review, I stated Chromecast is the best option for pure cost-cutting. At $35.99 there isn’t much out there that will beat that price point. You will need an existing smartphone, tablet or laptop to use Google Chromecast. Chromecast allows you to stream content from apps on the device to your television. Installation is easy as all you do is plug it into your TV’s HDMI port and set it up on your Wi-Fi network.

I have just started disability retirement. After figuring out the bills, I come up short. I called Spectrum to drop the HD channels and was informed that starting next month, all tvs must have a digital box. That forced me to drop one of the tvs. I have been paying Time Warner for 100mps for years but did a speed test to discover the speed is below 50 so I figure I will negotiate with them for the lower speed. My main question is: Blu Ray players have come way down in price and I know they have wi-fi capability. What options should I look out for? Will I have to buy a player for each tv? Are there conversion cords that will work with 20+ year televisions to connect blue ray?
Hulu With Live TV ($39.99/mo.): The package varies from region to region, but for the most part this is one of the most conveniently cable-like services out there. It has most of the major basic cable channels — including ESPN and the big cable news outlets (CNN, MSNBC, Fox News) — and some local broadcast channels. The base price also includes everything that standard Hulu has to offer and up to 50 hours of DVR recording of live telecasts. For additional fees, users can eliminate commercials on Hulu shows, expand the DVR storage and add subscriptions to HBO, Cinemax and Showtime.
Now there are some things about Tablo TV I need to get used to. When I bring up the app on the Roku box, I oddly have to remind it every time which Tablo TV box I’m tapping -- even though I only have one. And when I go to watch live TV, it takes a good 20-to-25 seconds to load each channel. This makes channel surfing rather impossible, especially when I have to return to the Live TV menu first before selecting another channel. And I’ve also had several scheduled recordings not record because the reception was too weak, according to the error message. As I mentioned, that’s a problem with our home and not Tablo.
Cons: When you record a show on YouTube, it's with the expectation that you can watch it the way a cord cutter would want to – with the ability to fast forward through commercials. But some shows come in as video-on-demand versions – and no functionality to zip through the ads.. YouTube needs to be clearer about what you're getting, as cable DVRs don't put you through this torture. 
Not everything is free: Although over-the-air TV reception and many streaming channels are free, there are many streaming channels and services that require a monthly subscription or pay-per-view fee. If you only pay for one or two subscription-based or pay-per-view services, you can save money over cable/satellite. However, if you keep adding more pay services, those fees can add up, and you might again find yourself with a hefty monthly subscription or pay-per-view bill that could rival that old cable/satellite bill.
I saw somewhere online that there is a free streaming service that offered nearly 200 channels for free. Why do You not include that service in Your overview? You are right about Direct T.V. That's what I have now and it is EXPENSIVE and a terrible service. I am hell bent on getting rid of it. I just can't decide whether to go with streaming or a cable service. How dependable are the steaming services?
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DIRECTV NOW was DIRECTV’s way of keeping its satellite TV service available for users who don’t want a dish installed or multi-year contracts. You can use the Just Right package and add HBO (Game of Thrones and Westworld for only $5 more per month instead of $15? Yeah, we’re in). Consider also that you can get your favorite networks like HGTV, Sundance TV, and the Travel Channel. Plus, you can also record up to 20 hours of TV to hold onto for 30 days with the included cloud DVR.
In my Google Chromecast Review, I stated Chromecast is the best option for pure cost-cutting. At $35.99 there isn’t much out there that will beat that price point. You will need an existing smartphone, tablet or laptop to use Google Chromecast. Chromecast allows you to stream content from apps on the device to your television. Installation is easy as all you do is plug it into your TV’s HDMI port and set it up on your Wi-Fi network.

If consolidating your monthly fees and needs into one location sounds ideal, try Amazon Prime Video. This is an especially valuable option if you’re already an Amazon Prime member as it comes at no additional cost. Not yet an Amazon Prime member? Then this cable TV alternative costs $99 for a full year. At $8.25 per month, it’s a small price to pay for all the Prime Membership benefits.
Roku ($29.99 - $99.99): One of the pioneers in the concept of cheaply and simply turning any TV into a streaming portal, Roku offers a wide range of products, from simple sticks to bigger (yet still compact) boxes. Because it’s been around so long, Roku has agreements with pretty much every major and minor streaming video service, and it is even integrated into some smart TV models. The company has also been giving its customers more power to control the sound of what they’re watching, with features like “night mode” (which mutes explosions and amplifies whispers) and “private listening” (which allows viewers to watch a show or movie on their TVs but listen to it through headphones).
We’re torn on this policy. On the one hand, you get a pretty good deal for the first year of service. But on the other hand, price hikes suck. Especially when your monthly price doubles for the second year. It’s a pretty big knock on DIRECTV. But as long as you’re aware of the jump up front, you can plan on it., and you still get a decent deal over the life of your contract.

There are now only two choices—down from five—for new subscribers: The $50-a-month DirecTV Now Plus plan has about 40 channels, and the $70-a-month DirecTV Now Max has about 50 channels, plus Cinemax and a number of sports channels, including regional sports. Both plans now include HBO, which had been a $5-a-month add-on. You get a free cloud DVR with 20 hours of free storage, and two users can stream at the same time. You can get a third simultaneous stream for an extra $5 more a month.
With the Digital Starter package starting at $49.99 per month, Xfinity comes in with the best all-around package out of all our recommended TV providers. The channel selection for Xfinity’s entry package is pretty similar to DISH’s base-level package (including channels like ESPN, TNT, AMC, and Discovery). It’s also a better bargain than the satellite service (and the next-closest cable TV provider, Spectrum) by about  $10 per month.
A typical triple play bundle package that includes home phone, satellite TV, and a high-speed reliable internet connection costs approximately 30 to 50 percent less than purchasing each one of these services separately. Over the course of a year or two, this will certainly be a blessing to you, as you will be able to save hundreds of dollars in the meantime.
One of my personal favorites is Amazon Prime, which gives you access to thousands of free TV shows, movies, and documentaries, and there are thousands of other movies and shows available on a pay per view basis. There is a monthly fee to use Amazon Prime, but it is much more than just a TV subscription as you can also get free 2-day shipping from Amazon, borrow Kindle books for free, and more – all for less than $8 a month (Amazon Prime is one of the best deals in the tech world, in my opinion!).

Fios TV is #1 in customer ratings in HD picture quality and signal reliability, according to the 2017 American Customer Satisfaction Index. In fact, every major customer satisfaction study ranked Fios higher overall than cable TV providers like Comcast, Spectrum (formerly Time Warner Cable), Cox and Cablevision. If you’re wondering what is the best alternative to cable, then check out how Fios compares to Cable TV, download and upload speeds as well as using video streaming services.


Hulu started life as an on-demand streaming service, but has more recently expanded into offering live TV as well. For $40 per month, you get Hulu's traditional catalog of streaming shows and movies, plus access to more than 50 live channels, from A&E to ESPN to TNT. Hulu with Live TV is particularly good at recommending new content, and its interface is one of the most colorful and navigable in the cable-replacement sphere. You'll have to deal with a ton of advertisements, though, and if you want more DVR space or simultaneous streams, you'll have to pay up to $30 extra per month.
With an antenna (get football games on NBC, ABC) and Sling TV (ESPN) and Thursday night football on Twitter app and the plethora of local hostelries (ahem, will Mr. PIE bust the budget on beer alone….?), I am covered nicely for Patriots games. Although getting a tad thin on QB choices for the next two games. I do miss not being able to see RedSox games on NESN however.

Also, all of the channels available from any of these cord cutting options are not offered by Comcast. The premium line-ups have to be purchased separately. So, trying to get multiple TVs with full DVR functionality, as well as keeping enough bandwidth for those times when a household is very busy, means not one of these cord cutting choices make any sense. They are over-priced, unless you are a single TV household or live in an area where OTA TV, cable, and phone service is very limited. I hate that Comcast has the upper hand. Verizon was blocked from putting FIOS in my area because I live in Comcast’s backyard. They have all the local politicians in their pocket. These companies like Sling, VUE, and the rest of them, want to see more cord cutting. They need to start putting all the preferred channels in their line-ups and making some offers where packaging premium stations gives a discount. This ala-cart pricing sucks to high heaven. It only benefits those who NEED a cord cutting option. But, it does nothing special for those who are using Comcast.
I've tried all the formentioned services except Hulu Live so far. Found the $35 DTVN package to be the perfect channel line up (especially that $5 HBO!) and user interface for me. However the technical issues cause me to long for something better. I had such high hopes for YouTube TV but the limited channel and device selection is a deal breaker. I'll be trying Hulu Live very soon (when my YouTube TV trial is over). This process of finding the best deal on high speed internet and the best streaming service is hard work. I also have a couple of Mohu antennas as my security net. Having choices is great!
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One of the great dreams of cord-cutting is that it will allow consumers to pick only the channels they actually want, rather than paying for programming they never watch. But the services above essentially operate more like traditional cable, providing packages of channels, not all of which are widely desirable. It’s unlikely that any one of these subscriptions will offer everything that a given consumer is looking for, and it will require viewers to scroll past a lot that they don’t.
Option 2: Hulu with live TV gives you unlimited access to the Hulu streaming library, over 60 live and On Demand sports, news, and entertainment channels, and lets you record up to 50 hours of live TV on Cloud DVR storage. All for a baseline cost of $44.99 a month. You can choose to pay more with specific add-ons such as enhanced Cloud DVR, unlimited screens, HBO, Starz, Showtime, and Cinemax.
I saw somewhere online that there is a free streaming service that offered nearly 200 channels for free. Why do You not include that service in Your overview? You are right about Direct T.V. That's what I have now and it is EXPENSIVE and a terrible service. I am hell bent on getting rid of it. I just can't decide whether to go with streaming or a cable service. How dependable are the steaming services?
If you have a TV in your house -- that is, a screen that incorporates a tuner -- you're part-way to cutting the cord already. An affordable indoor antenna hooked up to your TV will let you watch free TV over the air from any channel you receive in your local broadcast area. Antennas cost as little as $10. See our comparison of indoor antennas here.
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