2010 was the first year that pay television saw quarterly subscriber declines. In the second quarter of 2012, Sanford Bernstein determined that losses took place in five quarters.[5] Leichtman found that the decrease in pay subscriptions was not happening in large numbers. One reason was that some sports events, as well as other types of television (such as series airing on cable-originated networks), could not be seen online. Sanford Bernstein said the number of pay television subscribers increased by 677,000 during the first quarter of 2010, and a poll conducted by The New York Times and CBS News showed that 88% of people surveyed had such a service, and only 15% had considered going exclusively to web services. People under the age of 45, the survey said, were four times more likely to use the Internet only. To combat the trend, pay television providers were allowing people to stream television programs on desktop, laptop and tablet computers. Craig Moffett of Sanford C. Bernstein still stated that high prices and other methods would eventually drive customers away, calling cord cutting "perhaps the most overhyped and overanticipated phenomenon in tech history."[6]
This week Apple announced a new subscription TV service that will launch this fall. This new service will give you access to original Apple-created content. For now, we don’t know the cost or even the lineup of content that will launch with the service, but that has not stopped cable TV supporters from pushing the idea that cord cutting costs more than cable TV.
I have not had cable for almost 7 years now. I do not even miss it. Television is a good distraction but than there is also YouTube and Netflix. Just sayin. Also, I find that I am a lot more active when I am not constantly wanting to keep up with the next series of shows. If I had cable now, I would probably be following like 6 shows. I don’t have time for that nor do I want to devote any time for that. It is a personal choice I guess. But yah, cut the cord a long time ago.
Plenty of cable providers require customers to sign lengthy contracts, which can be both difficult and expensive to get out of. Contracts are particularly frustrating if you’re a renter or student and don’t know where you’ll be living next year. Fortunately, Verizon Fios won’t lock you into a contract. If you want standalone Fios TV, your plan is automatically month-to-month, with no cancellation fees.
That said, if you want a cable-like experience both at home and on the go without the dead weight that a cable subscription brings, then a streaming service is worth a look. There's no contract to sign, and if you don't like the service you're on, you can easily switch. So whether you're looking for a basic package such as Sling TV or want to pay more for a deluxe experience from the likes of PlayStation Vue, there should be a streaming TV service to suit you.
When it comes to standalone streaming services like Hulu or Sling TV, your viewing experience is completely dependent on your internet connection. So if the internet goes down or there are a ton of people in your neighborhood online at the same time, your speeds might be slow. You'll likely experience buffering, lagging, or even a completely frozen screen. With cable TV, you'll never have to worry about missing a moment, because the connection doesn't rely on your internet. Don't be that guy that misses the last 2 minutes of the Super Bowl: NO ONE wants to be that guy.

If you want to join them but don't want to ditch live TV completely, you've come to the right place. Live TV streaming services in the US like Sling TV and DirecTV Now let you watch most if not all of your favorite live TV channels -- from ABC to CBS to CNN to ESPN to Fox News to Nickelodeon -- streamed over the internet. And the monthly fee is likely far less than you're paying the cable company for TV.
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