Switching to streaming isn’t just for binging The Office on Netflix or watching yesterday’s episode of Bob’s Burgers on Hulu. You can sign up for services that allow you to stream select live TV channels, too. Some popular options are DIRECTV Now, PlayStation Vue, and Sling TV. Each allows you to choose between tiers of channels, but their base packages often offer many popular channels and for much cheaper than traditional cable. Curious about your options? We compare the best options in our TV streaming review.
Navigate Computer With Mouse & Keyboard:  You connect your computer to the HDTV (for the big screen) and then proceed to go to your favorite websites like hulu.com, Netflix and others (see some options above) to view your shows.  You can use the Hulu Desktop application.  You can also watch shows that you've downloaded from Amazon, Itunes or other online video sources – or your own videos.  You will most likely need a wireless keyboard and mouse to make this easy – although it isn't required.
Hey Matt, great question. Sling Box is not going to be related to Sling TV, and as far as I know there’s no benefit to having that box if you’re wanting to sign up for Sling TV. In terms of minimum internet speed, I would at least recommend 50mbps. That’s what I have at my house right now and it works the vast majority of the time; however, I think 100mbps would also be a much safer bet if you were looking for more constancy.

Disclaimer: The content on this site is for informational and entertainment purposes only and is not professional financial advice. References to third party products, rates, and offers may change without notice. Please visit the referenced site for current information. We may receive compensation through affiliate or advertising relationships from products mentioned on this site. However, we do not accept compensation for positive reviews; all reviews on this site represent the opinions of the author. Privacy Policy
Why not hook your TV to an antenna and get many HD channels for free. All local broadcasters CBS, ABC, NBC, PBS, FOX broadcast free over the air HD programs. That is zero monthly bill and zero is good. For sports and other program the internet is full of resources that offer most programming for free or a small fee such as Netflix and Hulu that you mentioned above. Why not suggest these to our readers?

You can use a TV antenna to watch live TV, sure, but this isn't the 1970s. You need a DVR (digital video recorder). Consider the Tivo Bolt Vox (above), a system with six tuners and 75 hours of recording on a 500GB drive for $199.99, or get 150 hours for $299.99. Four of the tuners support OTA recording. (Don't get the high-end $499.99 version—that's cable-ready only.) The companion Vox Mini box sold separately lets you expand DVR coverage to other rooms. As the "vox" implies, you utilize voice control through the remote to run the DVR. Plus, it has plenty of built-in streaming apps. TiVo has a few other OTA DVRs, as do companies like Tablo and Channel Master.

TV providers advertise low prices to entice new customers. These promotional rates will usually increase at the end of your initial contract and jump to the regular monthly price. However, some providers will increase rates in the middle of your contract. Most companies have rate information on their websites, but you should also confirm any rate increases with a sales representative.


Amazon Fire TV. Similar to Roku, Amazon Fire TV comes in both box format and stick format and runs on the Amazon Fire OS that is built on top of Android. This gives it access to Amazon's app store, and while it doesn't have quite the ecosystem of Apple TV, you can use it to both play games, watch TV and boot up other useful apps like Pandora Radio, Spotify, TED, etc.
Also, a little note, because my family uses ATT Unlimited for their cell phone service. I only pay $10/month for DirecTV Now. And every other package that I may want to try is $25 less than the general public (e.g. the "Just Right" package for me would cost $25, vs. $50 for the general public; the "Go Big" package is $35 for me, $60 for most others). Also, the premium channel HBO only costs me and anyone else just $5 more per month. I haven't experienced the "inconsistent video quality [and] a suboptimal interface" that you describe, but then again, I have 1 Gbit speed for my Internet connection. Even if I didn't have that speed, I think for the price of $15/month with live TV, and HBO to boot, it's a great deal, and DTV Now is getting better month-by-month. Yes, DVR is in beta, but it is going to happen.
I tested a number of indoor antennas, my community doesn’t allow outdoor antennas. I get all the OTA channels, perfectly clear, ABC, CBS & NBC plus others. You will need a “streaming device” like Roku (which has a lot of free channels & content) or Fire Stick. and eventually if you want, you can subscribe to the numerous services available, Hulu, Sling, Netflix, etc. They are all different prices and have some offers to try for free .
If your favorite part of cable is watching movies, cutting the cord might just maximize your bliss. Much like cable on-demand services, you can rent many of the latest releases on iTunes or Amazon for about $5 apiece. HBO also carries a wide selection of recent movies, and Netflix has a large back catalogue of films (though titles will appear and disappear somewhat randomly).

Amazon has already taken steps toward this idea. Its customers can subscribe to different content providers through Amazon Video Channels, including traditional television providers like HBO and Showtime as well as streaming content providers like Britbox and IndiePix Unlimited, then view them all through Amazon Prime Video. Individual accounts and payments are still required, but the notion of one killer app or portal that allows access to everything is such an enticing idea that it’s difficult to imagine that companies aren’t already discussing the possibility. And Xfinity’s deals with Netflix and Amazon suggest that even guarded companies with a strong proprietary interest in their original content are willing to come on board.
Those who end up cutting the cord never go back. That wouldn’t be hard to believe considering all the great services offered by some major online streaming services. We’re talking about youngsters mainly who don’t even bother and sign up for cable, to begin with. As they delve deeper into the world of video-on-demand subscription, 10-15$ becomes an amount worth the spend. Every service has something different to offer, and before you sign up for any, you might want to investigate which channel suits your preference best. Most of these services give you anywhere from a week to a month for you to evaluate them before charging you, and none of them include contract signing. The worst case scenario is that you’ll be stuck with a service you wish you hadn’t subscribed to for just a month. There’s no such thing as forced long-term commitment with streaming services. Now with that being said, let’s take a look at some of the best alternatives for Cable TV. Most of these stand-alone streaming services allow users to watch ABC, CBS, FOX, TNT, TMC, Discovery, History, Disney, National Geographic, NBC, ESPN and popular cable networks.
Now we’re paying half that for two accounts, and still have slick smartphones. You can pay even less for very reliable cellular service. Read about carriers like Republic Wireless or Straight Talk and Tello if you’re interested in delving into the subject. T-Mobile even has an offer where they will pay for your Netflix account if you sign up with their service. 

If you’ve ever doubted the excellence of YouTube, perform this simple exercise. Pick a favorite band or musical act, type in its name followed by “live” or “in concert”. It doesn’t matter what era we’re talking about, you’re going to find something amazing to watch – and it won’t be a program that you’ll ever find offered by Comcast, Spectrum or any other cable TV or satellite company.


If you have unpredictable tastes but focus on only one show at a time, it might make the most sense to buy your television à la carte. For the amount you’d save by switching from cable to just Internet service (about $900 a year), you can pick up 30 seasons of TV for $30 each. Assuming these are all 45-minute shows with 22 episodes, that’s almost 500 hours of content. If you can’t imagine yourself ever watching more than that, then this plan is for you. (Don’t forget to grab a TV antenna for major live events like the Oscars and the Super Bowl, or if you just want the option of kicking back and watching primetime now and then.)
I have started cutting the cord by adding antenna outside that is bringing in 34 channels. I use netflicks, hulu and fire tv. All 4 tvs using different devices. Dish reduce my bill and I keep 200 channels as I have no contract for 77.00 a month with one joey. looking forward to learn more from your website to get more value from the services I use.
With a fiber TV and internet connection, you get internet and TV signals via fiber-optic lines instead of copper lines or satellite radio signals. Fiber-optic lines use tiny strands of plastic or glass to transmit light in a binary data code, which means they have a higher bandwidth than copper wires. Copper wires, intended for voice transmission, can’t carry as much data as fiber-optic lines, which were designed for light transmissions.
Overall, Amazon is still playing catch-up when it comes to Netflix and other streaming services just because they don’t have as much content. However, at technically $8.25 / month it is a bit cheaper than your typical $8.99 or $9.99 package, and you get free, 2-day shipping as a perk. If you shop online a lot, that could end up swinging your choice.

One of my personal favorites is Amazon Prime, which gives you access to thousands of free TV shows, movies, and documentaries, and there are thousands of other movies and shows available on a pay per view basis. There is a monthly fee to use Amazon Prime, but it is much more than just a TV subscription as you can also get free 2-day shipping from Amazon, borrow Kindle books for free, and more – all for less than $8 a month (Amazon Prime is one of the best deals in the tech world, in my opinion!).
In March 2010, we got rid of one of Comcast’s “value packages” (what a joke) and reduced to basic cable. We’ve saved $1,000 and will let the $70 monthly savings pile up month after month, year after year. You’d be surprised at how well you can get along without things you don’t really need. Keep paying for things like premium cable TV and you’re likely to end up broke at age 50 and perhaps destitute at age 60.
You also don't need to fill tied to a particular day and time. There's a couple of good solutions for recording live television.  The TiVo Bolt includes the ability to record live television from an antenna, but you will still need to pay TiVo's $15 a month subscription. Tablo offers a cheaper solution, but it is still $5 a month. Last, there is Channel Master, which doesn't have a monthly subscription.

Offer ends 12/3/17, and is limited to new residential customers. Must subscribe to Starter TV or above and a post-pay subscription to a residential XFINITY Internet service. Limited to new XFINITY Mobile residential customers adding a new account with purchase of a qualifying mobile device. Port of existing mobile number required. Mobile order required within seven days of installation of XFINITY Internet. Cards issued by MetaBank®, Member FDIC, pursuant to a license from Visa® U.S.A. Inc. Cards will not have cash access and can be used everywhere Visa debit cards are accepted.
People living in remote valleys of the country came up with an innovative idea to solve their reception problems. They put up antennas on hilltops and ran cable wires into their house for better reception. The cable providers are currently using the same technology for offering a variety of channels and programs that meets the individual needs of every customer.
We’re all familiar with the frustrations that come with setting up new internet, cable TV, and other home services. We decided there had to be a better way to do this, so we created InMyArea.com to make the hassle of moving that much easier for our friends, family, and neighbors. InMyArea is here to help you compare the home services available in your area in order to find the provider that’s right for you and your budget. Whether you’re moving, looking to save money, or you just want a fresh start, we’ve got you covered. Built by family, for family, helping people is what we’re made for.

CableTV.com makes it easy to pick an Internet and TV service provider in Dallas. We have the scoop on Internet and TV provider options in Dallas, TX, including product reviews and prices for packages available in your area. With all that information readily available, you can quickly compare your options and determine which Internet and TV services fit your needs and your budget.
Pete, you can find some free sports on sites like NBC and ESPN3, but it’s not regular enough to catch all your favorites. I enjoy watching a good game now and then, but I’m not a die hard fan who has to catch every game his favorite team plays. So I’m pretty much content to watch whichever shows come on the regular network channels (even if I have to put up with commercials… sigh).
Believe it or not, you can still have all this for significantly less than the price of cable. Even after subscribing to HBO Now, Netflix, Hulu, CBS All Access, and Amazon Prime Video, you’ll still be more than $250 in the black. Don’t care for Girls or Game of Thrones? You can replace the HBO option with Sling TV for $60 more per year ($5 more per month); about the same price as buying two individual TV seasons.
As cord-cutting has picked up steam, many cable companies are offering their own "skinny bundle" packages with internet and a few channels for less. It seems counterintuitive, but in 2018, "cutting the cord" can still mean sticking with your current cable company. The important thing when comparing these services is to look at the contract requirements and extra fees. Even if a service price looks the same as many all-streaming packages, if you need to tack on an extra TV box or two the monthly fees will add up quickly.
×