The “retention desk” at Optimum kept going successively lower. First $62, then after a long hold while they were “processing my cancellation”, came back with $45 for a year at 60 MBPS – down from the 100 MBPS package they had in their standard package. I said they had to get to $40 for a year or $45 for 2 years or I was gone, but they could cut me to 50 MBPS or “even lower” – that the DSL speed was fine for my needs. We ended at an impasse and I said cancel me. It was like the guy got huffy and hung up on me.

Picture this. It's a lazy Sunday afternoon, and you want to rewatch your favorite show for the tenth time. You log into your Netflix account and realize to your horror that your show has been taken off of the service. How are you supposed to binge watch now? Stand alone streaming services are notorious for adding and removing titles from their library abruptly and without explanation. Your favorite show or movie might be there one day and gone the next. With cable TV, you can set up a series recording for your show so you can watch every episode. While Netflix might stop airing your show mid-series, the show's TV network won't. Many providers like DIRECTV and Spectrum also offer On-Demand features with thousands of titles that you can watch from any of your devices at anytime. This means you can still binge watch your favorite shows at no additional cost. You'll also be able to watch your shows as soon as they air with a cable or satellite TV connection. With streaming services like Netflix, you might not be able to watch the season for several months after it airs on live TV. By the time the latest season shows up on Netflix, your friends will have spoiled all the important plotlines and shocking moments.
A la carte TV is basically already here. It may not be in the exact form you want it. But if you can’t find something to watch these days between your TV antenna and streaming box, then I suggest you sell your TV and stick with books. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that.) Even though I pay for Netflix, Amazon Prime and Philo every month, I still love free apps like YouTube. 
Not everyone thought this was a good service when it debuted, but it's so far stuck with that "introductory" price that would put it in line with icky cable subscriptions. If you've got an AT&T phone plan, you can add DirecTV Now for just $10 a month; HBO is included if you've got an AT&T Unlimited Choice or Plus plan. You can watch DirecTV Now on your PC via browser, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, ChromeCast, Roku devices, iOS, and Android—it's not on any game consoles. Lacking however: DVR options. There's plenty of video on demand, but not for every show.
6 months ago I decided to try and replace my Dish Network service. I built a HTPC with plenty of power, storage, and have a pretty high speed internet service. I put up an outside antenna and get all the stations from about 60 miles away in the computer using a Hauppauge 4 tuner card. Then I started looking at program content providers including IPTV providers and several others such as Hulu and DirecTV Now. I was able to get Kodi and NextPVR loaded on the computer and had some success with OTA and the 2nd IPTV provider I tried. Then I had a problem with them. I decided I would go with DirecTV Now and actually got it working but not with Kodi. I think PlayOn will allow me to connect DTVN to Kodi but not sure how that will work.
Can you please help me. I live in Mexico. I have a Shaw box and get cable from Canada. They are changing so I need to change. I have no idea what to do. Some people here have roku, others netflix. I have a JVC and Samsung purchased in Mexico. I like to watch the British dramas Shaw offers on my 5 PBS channels. I also watch HGTV and vet shows. I have read a lot but am confused. What do I do?

These antennas are compatible with all televisions made since 2007 (when built-in digital tuners became a federal requirement) and they plug directly into the coaxial port in back of your TV. Once plugged in, you simply have your TV scan for available digital signals. Most TVs have a signal meter display that shows just how well each channel's signal is being received.
Digital antennas are awesome. You can get an inexpensive digital antenna at any electronics store for less than $40. Here is the cool thing about digital TV – you get a perfect signal, or you get nothing. You don’t have to deal with the fuzzy picture and static sounds of yesterday’s rabbit ears. The best part is that many TV stations now broadcast in HD. So you can get HD quality television over the air – which believe it or not, is often better quality than what you would get through a cable TV connection because of signal degradation and compression.
This is a little hard to answer because I don’t know the make and model of your TV. That said, your antenna should be plugged in to your ATSC input, and you will need to scan for channels once the antenna is plugged in. Your QAM input is not for your antenna. It’s for a cable hookup. If you have a quality TV, I imagine the picture-in-picture should work with OTA channels unless your tuner has some kind of restriction.
What are the best Cable TV Alternatives for cordcutters? Are you tired of paying crazy fees for cable? Do you want to enjoy some good TV without going bankrupt? Join the club, the cord-cutters club. You better be ready to say goodbye to cable and satellite because come on who watches traditional TV anymore? The future of TV watching belongs to online streaming services that deliver live (and on-demand) channels over the internet. We’re not saying they’re free or ridiculously cheap, but they sure do cost a lot less than cable and satellite. Bring live TV and quality content back into your home without running an outrageous bill with Cable TV alternatives like Netflix, DirecTV Now, PS Vue, Hulu Live TV, and YouTube TV.
Local cord-cutting numbers are more difficult to come by. Cable companies hold most subscriber-specific information close to the chest, and generally won’t give out even a ballpark number of customers. That’s because the competition is tight — Spectrum and Frontier Communications are the main competitors for cable and internet customers in Tampa Bay, and every customer counts.
For example, if your TV isn’t working, you can designate whether it’s grainy, frozen, tiled, blue, or black. After a few more questions about your service, you’ll get a specific solution and clear way forward (even if that means scheduling professional help). It’s a small convenience, but we love the option to handle simple fixes ourselves, instead of having to parse through outdated forums or spend our lunch break on hold with a technician.
Many rely on their cable provider for home phone service. Like most of their services, it can be replaced with a much cheaper internet based service. For those who need a little more than a cell phone after they ditch their cable TV subscription, I recommend PhonePower (formerly BroadVoice.) They are an affordable and reliable phone service provider that uses your existing internet connection.

Allconnect.com presents information collected independently from official provider websites. We regularly update the site in an effort to keep this information up-to-date and accurate at all times. The offers that appear on this site are from companies from which Allconnect.com receives compensation. Allconnect.com does not include every service provider available.

The digital landscape is already fragmented, and it’s continually fragmenting further, as content creators choose to become content providers. In the process, it’s beginning to resemble cable television. Each new app or content library looks like a different channel to consider, and each one is essentially a premium cable offering that requires a separate subscription to view. Services that previously acted as content aggregators are losing outside content with the launch of each new service. Instead, they are creating their own content to maintain value in a crowded marketplace. Even YouTube is getting in on the act, creating more and more channels for viewers to choose from.
Apple TV has direct access to some streaming services using the remote control, and for others you must use an Apple device to cast the service to the TV. In addition, neither Chromecast nor Apple TV provides native access to the Amazon streaming service, so if you are an Amazon Prime member using either of these devices you are missing out on the valuable benefits from your Prime membership.

There are also usually "upstream" channels on the cable to send data from the customer box to the cable headend, for advanced features such as requesting pay-per-view shows or movies, cable internet access, and cable telephone service. The "downstream" channels occupy a band of frequencies from approximately 50 MHz to 1 GHz, while the "upstream" channels occupy frequencies of 5 to 42 MHz. Subscribers pay with a monthly fee. Subscribers can choose from several levels of service, with "premium" packages including more channels but costing a higher rate. At the local headend, the feed signals from the individual television channels are received by dish antennas from communication satellites. Additional local channels, such as local broadcast television stations, educational channels from local colleges, and community access channels devoted to local governments (PEG channels) are usually included on the cable service. Commercial advertisements for local business are also inserted in the programming at the headend (the individual channels, which are distributed nationally, also have their own nationally oriented commercials).


I was a loyal cable TV customer for all of my adult life, paying about $34/month for basic cable (which sounds ludicrously cheap now). Then I moved to a different city where the cost was $52/month for basic cable. I paid it and figured, “well, that’s just the cost of getting TV”. More and more, however, I realized that I wasn’t getting good TV. I was just surfing through the channels over and over looking for good TV. Then, my 6-month “introductory cable rate” ended and my cable bill went up to $57/month. Sure, it was only a few dollars more, but that was the last straw. After a few months of putting up with the higher cost and lack of good shows, I decided to “Disable My Cable” and try broadcast digital TV. The first thing I tried was an old rabbit-ear antenna that I had from the pre-digital TV days… Read the rest of my story here.
Amazon Prime Video has a pretty huge collection of newer movies, and more importantly, exclusive shows that are really well done. It’s now $119 per year, and comes with an assortment of other perks like free shipping, a one million song library and access to free Kindle books. But for me, the value comes with Amazon’s homegrown movies and series. Many, if not all, are shot in 4K HDR (Ultra HD) so it’s nice to have that option without having to pay more for it (like Netflix).
A Nielsen report showed that during the fourth quarter of 2011, the number of people paying for television had dropped by 15 million people (a rate of 1.5 percent), and the number of cable subscribers dropped by 2.9 million.[11] A 2012 Deloitte report said 9% of television households dropped cable service during 2011 and an additional 11% planned to cancel their service.[12] Sanford Bernstein estimates 400,000 dropped pay video services during the second quarter of 2012, up from 340,000 in 2011. One reason for the drop was college students' returning home for the summer, while the companies made up for the loss in other quarters. However, the number of new homes paying for television service is less than the total number of new homes.[5] Another possible reason is services, such as time shifting and live recording capabilities, that were once exclusive to pay television services, are now being offered to cord cutters.[13] Although the number of subscribers usually increases in the third quarter, in 2012 only 30,000 people added pay television service, according to a study by the International Strategy & Investment Group. Cable lost 340,000 subscribers (with Time Warner Cable accounting for 140,000 of that number) and satellite gained only 50,000; telephone companies added 320 subscribers.[14] Throughout 2012, pay television added only 46,000 new subscribers, out of 974,000 new households overall, according to SNL Kagan. 84.7 percent of households subscribed, compared to 87.3 percent in early 2010.[15]
As part of this switch over, we installed an over-the-air antenna. This allows us to pick up a large number of local channels. We live close enough to the Des Moines metro area that we can pick up strong signals from a lot of stations in Des Moines. (It’s worth noting that this is aided by the fact that there’s a repeater tower within five miles of our house, which means the signals are strong.) This includes the major broadcast networks – ABC, CBS, Fox, NBC, PBS – and a large number of additional channels of varying quality, including an all-children’s channel and a channel that seems to be nothing but a loop of the weather forecast.

Many cord-cutters say that they canceled their cable TV plan and opted for online streaming services to save money. In reality, you might actually end up paying more money or dealing with more hassle than the small savings are worth. Each streaming service has its own library of shows and movies. In order to get all of the shows that you watch on TV, you'll probably have to purchase several different streaming service memberships. Let's say your favorite things to watch are Game of Thrones, the ESPN Network, This is Us, and Jane the Virgin. You'll need HBO Now, the ESPN+ app, Hulu, and Netflix to watch all of these programs. That adds up to a cost of about $40 a month. Plus, you'll have to manage 4 different accounts, which is such a headache. DIRECTV's Entertainment TV package lets you watch all of these shows and networks at the same price of $40. Plus, you'll have access to over 160 live channels and thousands of On Demand titles on a single platform. You can even stream content from your phone, tablet, or laptop on the go.
Free yourself of some common misconceptions and all the bad advice you’ve read. Read the findings of the 2016 Congressional investigation by Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Mo), a top ranking chairman on the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. Her committee delved into pricing and customer service practices for the major cable providers across the U.S.
Cable ISPs leverage some of the bandwidth they use to bring people television service to deliver data - thankfully without any noticeable negative impact to the former, in most cases. Cable is an always-on connection, which means that your modem is always in communication with your ISP, and it tends to be faster than DSL because your distance from the service provider isn't an issue. The only drawback of cable internet is that service delivery is sometimes less reliable during peak usage hours, as cable customers local to one another share their bandwidth.
◊ To qualify for the contract buyout program, a customer must order and install a qualifying Triple Play or limited Double Play promotion; offers not available in all areas. Offer available to qualifying customers only who have no outstanding obligations to Charter. Check amount will be determined by the early termination fee on the final bill from the previous provider, not to exceed $500. For contract buyout qualifications, go to Spectrum.com/buyout.
This is quite unlikely. Because at present, there aren’t a whole lot of areas in the continental United States that don’t receive cable. This wired facility is not only responsible for transmitting cable TV, however. In most locations, cable is also used to provide high-speed internet and digital phone. And many people like it this way. Because cable connections are generally considered to be more reliable than most wireless linkages. Also, they can sometimes be much cheaper. To gain a complete picture of all the cable companies in your area, get in touch with us today. Don’t bother coping with lengthy Google searches. Call our dedicated helpline now, and get some straight-up answers. Because it’s your dollar that’s on the line!
Whether the price is worth it is in the eyes of the beholder. Vue may not be the cheapest, but many users feel it is the best value according to anecdotal reports in various forums. That assessment is based on features, channel selection, user interface, DVR, etc. Regardless of which streaming service is chosen, the vast majority of cord cutters claim they are saving a bundle compared to traditional cable/satellite. As for Vue's competitors, by the time you include add-ons (e.g., sports and/or movie packages) and premium channels, are you really saving much? Some of the competition also charges extra for DVR usage, but not with Vue.
I started out at $98 with my current bill, including two $10/mo cable boxes for decoding even the basic cable (local channels), which I had cut back to in March from a $200 bill under a “promo” deal for staying with their “triple play”. I had also just bought a $19 HD TV antenna and can pick up all but 3 of the 60 channels in reach perfectly on my first pass. I bet I can get those 3 clear (one is ABC) if I work at location/angle. Also took out a PlayStation Vue free week trial offer, and it works fine on my smart Sony Android TV (have to upgrade my dumb one which has Apple Gen 3 – probably will do your recommended Amazon FireTV).

The only reasons not to get an inexpensive antenna are because you don’t want to fuss between different inputs, or you can’t find a suitable window or another spot in your home. Other than that, it’s the best way to ensure you get all your local channels, which many streaming services lack in some form. Read our comparison of the best antennas available right now.

Once tuners that could receive select mid-band and super-band channels began to be incorporated into standard television sets, broadcasters were forced to either install scrambling circuitry or move these signals further out of the range of reception for early cable-ready TVs and VCRs. However, once all 181 allocated cable channels[which?] had been incorporated, premium broadcasters were left with no choice but to scramble.


There are drawbacks, most having to do with content licensing restrictions. Netflix still has a good number of films in its vast library that are unavailable for streaming. With Hulu Plus, TV shows are generally embargoed until at least the day after their original network air dates. And there can also be restrictions on which seasons of a show are available. Perhaps most frustrating, licensing terms for some shows stipulate that while they can be watched on a computer or mobile device for free on Hulu's website, they are prohibited from being viewed on the TV even with a paid Hulu Plus subscription. But remember, an antenna gets you free OTA network channels, so if you're able to work your schedule around the networks' (like in the old days) you can minimize this inconvenience.

Each live TV subscription has a limited number of streams per household. PlayStation Vue, for example, offers up to 5 streams on different devices; YouTube TV offers up to three streams at once. So the question might be for you: How often do you have all five TVs going at once. An outdoor antenna with a splitter can deliver free over-the-air channels to all your TVs with no limitations.
This streaming service has the seasons of most, if not all, broadcast TV series such as (ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, The CW) with the latest recently aired episodes. Hulu also hosts a large selection of cable network series (including Comedy Central, MTV, and A&E). They have a movie library, but its content is not that good. Although their number of originals doesn’t match those of Netflix, Hulu has been trying to push some of its originals like The Hotwives of Orlando and Deadbeat. Their service costs about 7.99$ a month, 11.99$ if you want a commercial-free streaming experience. For those who are addicted to traditional television,  Hulu Live TV is their best chance at watching the full lineups of national networks and locals. If you’re are TV-oriented, Hulu Plus is the best option for you. While you can get plenty of Hulu for free, paying 8$ on a monthly basis will get you the next-day service you need.
Smart TVs are great until they are no longer smart. Not all makers of Smart TVs keep the services updated after the TV comes off the manufacturing line. In addition, Smart TVs contain just a small amount of Flash memory, which means they are very limited to the number of streaming services they can put on the TV. It's possible that the streaming services included with your Smart TV at purchase could end up being the only ones you'll have for the duration of ownership. Since most Americans keep TVs for 7-10 years (longer than we keep automobiles), a Smart TV is not necessarily a "smart" long-term solution for cord cutters.
Showtime Online has a unique service of being able to be added on to other services that you may already subscribe to. For $9 a month, it can be added to Amazon Prime and Hulu and for $11, Playstation Vue. Showtime offers you award-winning series like Dexter, Weeds and House of Lies as well as a large selection of movies including action, comedies and dramas added each month. The stand-alone service is $11 and it offers both live viewing and streaming.
First, buy a dongle or antenna (or both) and connect to your television. Research and determine which device you want to use. Some people prefer to stick with a specific manufacturer because they have other products from the same place (for example, users of Amazon Alexa might prefer an Amazon Fire Stick while Google Home owners might prefer a Chromecast). Your budget and personal preferences should drive this decision. 
×